MUNISING, MICHIGAN - The Munising Vanguard Singers will perform their Annual Spring Sing concert on Saturday, May3, 7:00 pm at the Good shepherd Lutheran Church in Munising. The Grace Notes of the Escanaba Remnants Barbershop Chorus will also be performing at the concert.

Tickets can be purchased from any Vanguard member for $7.00, or at the door the evening of the concert. For more information, call Paul at 906-439-5967.

The sight and sound of sharp-tailed grouse dancing on a lek (dancing/breeding ground) is one of natures true spectacles. Males stomp their feet as fast as they can, causing their tails to rattle. At the same time they inflate purple neck sacks, called gular, which produce a unique sound. Meanwhile the females sit back and watch carefully to select their mate. The romance is fleeting and the hen will be left to raise the young on her own. Couple this show with the early morning light of dawn and you have the backdrop for a wonderful and unforgettable morning.

As a citizen scientist you will be asked to hike one mile at first light to make it to the blind by dawn. Like the saying goes “The early bird gets the …” well in the grouse world we are going to have to say hen. After reaching the blind you will take weather readings then rest for a bit before you begin to count. For one hour you will count the dancing grouse and the non-dancing grouse for one minute every ten minutes. The rest of the time is yours to watch, photograph, or video tape the grouse. Stay as long as you like before you hike out again.

Participants are required to watch a video and pass a short quiz prior to participating in the survey. Several dates are still available! Because of the nature of the study, we will try to pair people up into teams if you do not have a partner. However, a partner is not required to participate. For more information or to sign up contact Sara Giles by email: Sara_Giles@fws.gov or call (906) 586-9851 x10.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ Eastern Lake Superior Management Unit in Fisheries Division has announced public forums in Newberry and Munising to discuss local and statewide fisheries management activities and concerns.

The forums will be held on Tuesday, April 8 from 7-8:30 p.m. (EDT) at the Tahquamenon Area Public Library located at 700 Newberry Avenue in Newberry and on Monday, April 14 from 7-8:30 p.m. (EDT) at Sydney’s Restaurant located at 400 Cedar Street in Munising.

“Conversations & Coffee with DNR Fisheries Division” will take place in each of the eight management units that oversee Michigan’s fisheries. The purpose of these forums will be to meet managers and biologists, to discuss local issues and management activities, and to get specific questions answered.

These informal forums will also make information available on local and statewide regulations impacting anglers. Refreshments will be provided.

To see a full list of forums occurring throughout the state, visit www.michigan.gov/fishing. For more information on the Newberry and Munising forums, contact Cory Kovacs at kovacsc@michigan.gov or 906-293-5131.

Upcoming Alger Blood Drive April 21st

April 21, 2014: Neenah Papermill (Munising)

The U.P. Regional Blood Center, a service of Marquette General, will hold a Bloodmobile blood drive on Monday, April 21 at the Neenah Papermill in Munising from 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. For an appointment, call Robin Maxon at (906) 387-7556.

TDS® announces the ARRA broadband stimulus project is complete; high-speed Internet service now available to businesses and nearly 1,300 households in areas around Chatham, Au Train.

MADISON, Wis. (April, 2014)—TDS Telecom (TDS®) announces its broadband Internet project in Michigan — around Au Train and Chatham — is now complete. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) stimulus-funded project makes high-speed Internet accessible to just over 1,300 area residents and businesses, about 400 more homes than projected in TDS’ application for funding.

In November 2012, TDS announced a portion of this project in Michigan was completed; the portion around Au Train remained a work in process.

“This was a large and complicated project,” says Joe Kirk, manager of Project Implementation at TDS. “Pulling it all together successfully took the effort of many teams, people, and partnerships.”

Kirk points to the following for their efforts and ongoing support:

· Local TDS team, led by David Moore

· TDS support teams in Madison, Wis.

· CHR Solutions, the engineering firm

· Vendor partners Alcatel-Lucent USA, Calix, Inc., Metaswitch Networks, and R. Roese Contracting Company

· Rural Utilities Service liaisons William Vogt and Kristine Reddy

TDS installed more than 125 miles of fiber optics cabling and 29 cabinets (which protect the advanced network electronics) throughout its Chatham Telephone Company. Customers interested in signing up for services should call 888-CALL-TDS (888-225-5837).

This is one of 44 projects that TDS is receiving funding for from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Utilities Service (RUS) as part of the ARRA. TDS projected the cost at about $8.6 million, which is funded in part by the RUS grant.

Nationwide, more than 95 percent of TDS customers already have access to high-speed Internet service. TDS is intent on providing as many remaining customers with broadband connectivity as possible. According to TDS, federal stimulus funds are helping to close the gap and deliver Internet connectivity to more than 27,000 customers.

For background information and updates, visit www.tdstelecom.com/stimulus.

Seating was at a premium at Red Rock Lanes in Ishpeming last night.

Seating was at a premium at Red Rock Lanes in Ishpeming last night.

The lines were long and the excitement was palpable outside of Red Rock Lanes & Banquet Center in Ishpeming.  Some people were just looking for a night out, others a nice meal courtesy of Mama Russo’s, but most people had their eyes on the prize:  A John Deere Zero-Turn Mower from Michigan Sales & Equipment of Marquette.  We here at Great Lakes Radio pride ourselves on how many people we can reach with any of our stations, but even we were surprised by the turn-out that we saw last night.  People from all over the U.P. flocked to Country Village from Escanaba, Champion, and even Engadine!  Another thing we pride ourselves on is being able to host a boss party.  Sure, we could just send out a few hundred “Sorry, but you lost e-mails” and tell whoever wins that they won, but that just wouldn’t be our style.

Despite people lining up as early as 4:30, we weren’t able to open the doors until a little after 6pm.  You fine people were able to mosey in, grab a drink or two, and even submit a guess to the BioLife Life-saver jar.  The jar contained 771 lifesavers hard candies, and the closest guess came from Tyler Machiela of Marquette with 765.  That’s pretty good in my book.  If you were on a nice health kick, after you signed up at BioLife you could head over to the Synergy Fitness table and partake in many of the deals that they were offering!  Once we had everybody seated, it was time for dinner!  With over 350 people present, the crew from Mama Russo’s had their work cut out for them.  They didn’t disappoint as there was enough left over for the Great Lakes Radio crew to go last and come back for seconds.

Good thing we did this at the beginning of the golfing season!

Good thing we did this at the beginning of the golfing season!

Once everybody was well fed and ready to find out who was going to go home with the coveted prize, we had to throw them a curve ball.  It was time for everybody who was fortunate enough to have an invite slip (some 150 people) to have a chance to earn one free game of bowling at Red Rocks Lanes by showing off their inner-Tiger Woods with a putting contest.  While there were plenty of wide misses, easy victories, and many a heartbreak, countless people walked away with a free game of bowling in their back pockets.

It was now time for the moment that everybody had been waiting for:  The Grand Prize drawing.  Just who would be walking away from the building with a John Deere Zero-Turn Mower in tow?  You could see people’s eyes lighting up as the first few digits of their tickets were called out, but only six people were fortunate enough to have every digit called out.  Once we had our “semi-finalists”, the time was nigh at hand.  Envelopes were opened, hearts were racing, and one lucky man came out on top:  Daniel Beltz of Marquette!  Standing in the middle of the pack, he went from passively opening his envelope to throwing a victorious fist into the air with a huge smile on his face.

We're just full of shenanigans...

Dan Beltz (Front Center) gets congratulated by a bunch of people full of shenanigans.

All this was possible due to our fabulous sponsors tonight:  SIR Federal Credit Union, Togo’s, Norway Springs, Carmike Cinemas, Pike Distributors & Labatt Blue, Globe Printing, and Hudson’s Classic Grill.  We here at Great Lakes Radio really enjoy reaching out to Yoopers everywhere over 200 miles of God’s country!  Thank you so much for all of your support and giving us the ability to provide you all with a wonderful night.

You can see plenty more pictures from the night’s events by clicking RIGHT HERE!

ALGER COUNTY, MICHIGAN - The Hiawatha National Forest (HNF) in cooperation with the Superior Watershed Partnership are seeking volunteers to help with seeding a few thousand cells with common milkweed and a mix of pollinator nectar plants on Thursday, April 17th from 10am until 3pm (pot luck lunch at noon) at the Forest greenhouse located at 1030 Wright Street, Marquette.

Common milkweed is an important host plant for the Monarch butterfly and a critical component in our pollinator habitat restoration. HNF is planting milkweed at critical areas for pollinators and has been for a number of years through projects such as the old farm field restoration on Grand Island. There since 2008 through the help of Life of Lake Superior volunteers and others we have introduced back into the landscape nearly 10,000 common and swamp milkweed plants. In order to provide necessary habitat for a suite of pollinator species such as monarch butterflies, hummingbirds, bumble bees, moths and bats we have planned pollinator habitat restoration work the summer of 2014 at Stonington Peninsula where the nationally recognized monarch openings occur, Peninsula Point where we are removing by hand invasive non-native black swallow-wort from known monarch habitat, Sandtown near Nahma where we are removing by hand invasive spotted knapweed from monarch habitat along Lake Michigan shoreline, Grand Island National Recreation Area at the old farm field restoration site and three large grass land openings (Dunklee, Baldy Lake and Ready Lake) where we are introducing a mix of pollinator species plants in order to provide greater plant and future animal diversity within the openings.

Understanding monarch butterflies is truly a mystery and a magical aspect of nature. A few fun facts about monarch butterflies… did you know common milkweed is the host plant for monarch butterflies? The female monarch butterfly lays only one egg per plant on the underside of milkweed leaves. Within roughly 3-6 days a small, creamy colored caterpillar about the size of a pin will emerge and begin feeding on that milkweed leaf. From birth it only takes about 6 hours for the caterpillar to change from its creamy coloration to yellow, black and white stripes. And did you know one caterpillar can consume up to 20-30 leaves before it is full-grown! Monarch caterpillars eat plants only in the milkweed family. In North America we have over 100 known species of milkweed, although monarch’s have been documented feeding on only 27 of those species. Monarchs sequester a poisonous cardiac glycoside from milkweed, thus effectively protecting them from predation. Once they shed their skin (about five times) the caterpillar will be about 2 inches in length and it weighs almost 3,000 times more than it did at birth! After the 5th shed, the monarch butterfly will create its chrysalis. It will take between 9 to11 days for the fully formed monarch butterfly to emerge from its chrysalis. Our adult monarch butterflies migrate nearly 2,000 miles south to Mexico and arrive in Mexico around the first of November.

Interested volunteers may help for an hour or more. No experience is needed because we will work alongside you and explain various aspects of native plant propagation. For further information please contact Deb Le Blanc at 387-2512 (extension 20) / email dleblanc01@fs.fed.us -or- Sue Rabitaille at srborealis@peoplepc.com.

Distribution of $100 Million Supplemental under Senate Bill 609 (S-3)
County Name Distribution Amount
Alcona 153,476.15
Alger 131,876.96
Allegan 537,450.92
Alpena 198,774.52
Antrim 214,953.63
Arenac 151,308.03
Baraga 128,579.20
Barry 296,856.46
Bay 488,565.76
Benzie 162,222.35
Berrien 666,967.34
Branch 262,050.86
Calhoun 517,020.90
Cass 287,933.77
Charlevoix 194,941.86
Cheboygan 234,529.42
Chippewa 295,098.39
Clare 232,587.10
Clinton 389,753.18
Crawford 153,488.62
Delta 243,232.58
Dickinson 179,691.70
Eaton 493,908.30
Emmet 235,590.85
Genesee 1,345,161.25
Gladwin 198,037.22
Gogebic 156,225.69
Grand Traverse 448,669.55
Gratiot 269,531.19
Hillsdale 275,915.60
Houghton 256,829.05
Huron 311,788.56
Ingham 795,788.27
Ionia 294,757.37
Iosco 222,036.05
Iron 140,784.17
Isabella 325,994.49
Jackson 668,811.45
Kalamazoo 838,353.32
Kalkaska 205,287.45
Kent 1,887,284.21
Keweenaw 75,800.20
Lake 172,884.22
Lapeer 432,616.26
Leelanau 179,765.60
Lenawee 446,817.38
Livingston 792,221.53
Luce 108,820.21
Mackinac 144,430.57
Macomb 2,435,600.44
Manistee 231,571.31
Marquette 362,872.37
Mason 235,062.04
Mecosta 254,391.92
Menominee 214,408.66
Midland 359,665.28
Missaukee 184,008.42
Monroe 664,992.85
Montcalm 351,972.83
Montmorency 138,350.47
Muskegon 588,239.33
Newaygo 340,744.84
Oakland 3,861,456.65
Oceana 241,436.29
Ogemaw 188,843.39
Ontonagon 151,163.30
Osceola 217,959.22
Oscoda 141,796.71
Otsego 233,059.88
Ottawa 1,077,088.76
Presque Isle 167,004.04
Roscommon 236,684.09
Saginaw 805,768.68
Sanilac 336,045.14
Schoolcraft 118,259.83
Shiawassee 331,612.50
St. Clair 668,682.52
St. Joseph 295,984.01
Tuscola 351,511.80
Van Buren 377,722.52
Washtenaw 1,091,502.29
Wayne 3,740,802.50
Wexford 258,265.39
TOTAL: 39,100,000.00

Distribution of $100 Million Supplemental under Senate Bill 609 (S-3)
City/Village Name Distribution Amount
Addison $3,368.11
Adrian $81,945.08
Ahmeek $1,000.51
Akron $2,421.02
Alanson $3,912.29
Albion $37,411.20
Algonac $16,132.18
Allegan $22,723.74
Allen $662.75
Allen Park $107,845.05
Alma $39,013.08
Almont $9,874.62
Alpena $50,255.16
Alpha $1,924.16
Ann Arbor $461,171.49
Applegate $2,065.39
Armada $6,525.86
Ashley $3,207.00
Athens $4,794.75
Au Gres $5,036.90
Auburn $8,987.43
Auburn Hills $85,255.96
Augusta $4,546.21
Bad Axe $13,457.31
Baldwin $6,917.90
Bancroft $3,273.55
Bangor $9,560.05
Baraga $9,091.54
Baroda $3,879.84
Barryton $1,756.91
Barton Hills $748.12
Battle Creek $301,288.60
Bay City $163,744.30
Bear Lake $1,600.16
Beaverton $5,108.44
Belding $27,270.83
Bellaire $5,230.86
Belleville $13,413.12
Bellevue $5,928.32
Benton Harbor $45,048.40
Benzonia $3,459.48
Berkley $53,685.52
Berrien Springs $7,662.48
Bessemer $17,491.26
Beulah $3,686.84
Beverly Hills $39,846.96
Big Rapids $40,261.96
Bingham Farms $4,046.88
Birch Run $7,229.02
Birmingham $76,023.35
Blissfield $14,276.90
Bloomfield Hills $18,817.74
Bloomingdale $3,093.51
Boyne City $24,022.36
Boyne Falls $2,364.40
Breckenridge $6,663.55
Breedsville $2,086.46
Bridgman $10,560.08
Brighton $28,472.43
Britton $2,514.18
Bronson $10,674.34
Brooklyn $5,834.27
Brown City $5,947.18
Buchanan $20,872.02
Buckley $4,211.52
Burlington $1,345.99
Burr Oak $4,523.18
Burton $152,377.40
Byron $3,040.97
Cadillac $47,865.75
Caledonia $6,111.77
Calumet $7,030.00
Camden $2,666.54
Capac $7,476.35
Carleton $7,676.26
Carney $1,926.48
Caro $17,704.57
Carson City $5,958.83
Carsonville $2,836.35
Caseville $4,316.86
Casnovia $2,239.58
Caspian $8,024.19
Cass City $11,777.35
Cassopolis $8,344.42
Cedar Springs $13,344.87
Cement City $2,879.24
Center Line $27,834.54
Central Lake $4,913.97
Centreville $6,245.81
Charlevoix $15,410.13
Charlotte $34,217.68
Chatham $2,589.59
Cheboygan $26,615.31
Chelsea $19,609.53
Chesaning $11,760.67
Clare $14,164.31
Clarkston $3,347.77
Clarksville $2,191.78
Clawson $40,796.57
Clayton $2,246.43
Clifford $2,833.08
Climax $3,610.59
Clinton $8,966.96
Clio $9,870.58
Coldwater $49,213.39
Coleman $7,005.75
Coloma $7,311.64
Colon $6,038.81
Columbiaville $4,094.39
Concord $5,787.36
Constantine $9,939.37
Coopersville $17,732.88
Copemish $2,312.99
Copper City $1,135.88
Corunna $14,841.35
Croswell $12,246.55
Crystal Falls $11,231.91
Custer $2,308.01
Daggett $2,467.86
Dansville $2,398.34
Davison $18,661.41
DeWitt $17,592.65
Dearborn $399,382.24
Dearborn Heights $206,083.84
Decatur $8,817.81
Deckerville $5,172.94
Deerfield $4,395.82
Detour $4,325.70
Detroit $3,298,154.38
Dexter $15,571.93
Dimondale $5,151.86
Douglas $8,238.62
Dowagiac $27,162.67
Dryden $4,080.78
Dundee $17,883.91
Durand $13,949.68
Eagle $800.72
East Grand Rapids $49,586.67
East Jordan $12,568.24
East Lansing $167,343.76
East Tawas $16,610.34
Eastlake $3,572.43
Eastpointe $114,910.19
Eaton Rapids $22,099.54
Eau Claire $3,284.30
Ecorse $33,682.87
Edmore $6,243.54
Edwardsburg $4,981.55
Elberta $3,658.02
Elk Rapids $11,472.07
Elkton $3,629.93
Ellsworth $3,695.97
Elsie $4,792.24
Emmett $2,221.48
Empire $2,748.60
Escanaba $58,809.31
Essexville $14,450.61
Estral Beach $2,938.52
Evart $10,449.60
Fairgrove $2,636.08
Farmington $35,066.18
Farmington Hills $329,548.55
Farwell $5,379.46
Fennville $5,789.51
Fenton $50,865.44
Ferndale $72,394.08
Ferrysburg $14,227.56
Fife Lake $3,143.54
Flat Rock $33,321.42
Flint $530,457.46
Flushing $33,022.29
Forestville $1,590.26
Fountain $2,104.79
Fowler $4,755.86
Fowlerville $12,543.32
Frankenmuth $20,927.48
Frankfort $7,406.16
Franklin $14,135.09
Fraser $47,211.66
Freeport $3,230.82
Freesoil $1,755.67
Fremont $20,781.99
Fruitport $6,208.69
Gaastra $4,010.50
Gagetown $2,805.00
Gaines $2,619.38
Galesburg $7,818.26
Galien $3,040.73
Garden $1,168.42
Garden City $101,498.62
Gaylord $18,986.11
Gibraltar $17,314.78
Gladstone $27,502.22
Gladwin $14,807.72
Gobles $4,182.55
Goodrich $7,299.75
Grand Beach $3,998.66
Grand Blanc $30,792.03
Grand Haven $46,697.10
Grand Ledge $28,183.64
Grand Rapids $836,577.04
Grandville $61,219.87
Grant $4,508.67
Grass Lake $5,837.13
Grayling $8,750.08
Greenville $38,904.94
Grosse Pointe $19,749.36
Grosse Pointe Farms $34,851.36
Grosse Pointe Park $40,790.98
Grosse Pointe Shores $11,210.43
Grosse Pointe Woods $56,169.11
Hamtramck $72,543.70
Hancock $25,423.58
Hanover $2,757.85
Harbor Beach $7,828.09
Harbor Springs $8,144.07
Harper Woods $47,825.80
Harrietta $1,639.15
Harrison $10,588.58
Harrisville $2,693.31
Hart $9,422.70
Hartford $11,611.48
Hastings $32,418.07
Hazel Park $59,367.31
Hersey $2,620.72
Hesperia $5,445.02
Highland Park $49,367.99
Hillman $4,483.63
Hillsdale $36,373.59
Holland $163,429.96
Holly $22,009.81
Homer $7,486.03
Honor $2,161.08
Hopkins $3,182.64
Houghton $37,322.67
Howard City $10,182.36
Howell $35,264.98
Hubbardston $3,033.40
Hudson $10,820.87
Hudsonville $29,723.15
Huntington Woods $22,685.09
Imlay City $16,133.74
Inkster $90,717.24
Ionia $37,332.74
Iron Mountain $41,462.55
Iron River $25,745.30
Ironwood $34,227.75
Ishpeming $38,191.62
Ithaca $15,579.17
Jackson $154,509.73
Jonesville $10,782.26
Kalamazoo $324,454.37
Kaleva $4,305.39
Kalkaska $12,123.16
Keego Harbor $9,738.62
Kent City $4,803.19
Kentwood $189,797.95
Kinde $2,592.92
Kingsford $27,946.03
Kingsley $6,819.47
Kingston $2,049.76
L’Anse $11,595.54
Laingsburg $6,411.99
Lake Angelus $737.93
Lake Ann $2,295.69
Lake City $4,967.48
Lake Isabella $11,286.71
Lake Linden $7,909.98
Lake Odessa $9,206.70
Lake Orion $10,516.29
Lakeview $6,388.61
Lakewood Club $7,356.93
Lansing $516,438.31
Lapeer $39,447.77
Lathrup Village $17,984.50
Laurium $13,910.34
Lawrence $6,312.24
Lawton $9,808.26
Lennon $2,173.91
Leonard $2,529.37
Leroy $2,838.11
Leslie $8,635.64
Lexington $4,567.37
Lincoln $3,428.49
Lincoln Park $143,235.40
Linden $14,786.22
Litchfield $6,660.99
Livonia $389,319.14
Lowell $15,893.47
Ludington $36,057.22
Luna Pier $6,255.63
Luther $3,832.80
Lyons $4,794.39
Mackinac Island $2,814.66
Mackinaw City $9,917.68
Madison Heights $107,400.21
Mancelona $6,734.57
Manchester $10,116.68
Manistee $34,184.89
Manistique $15,133.28
Manton $7,273.67
Maple Rapids $3,122.57
Marcellus $4,842.45
Marine City $16,593.50
Marion $5,623.77
Marlette $8,987.53
Marquette $97,413.30
Marshall $30,525.54
Martin $2,675.30
Marysville $40,099.78
Mason $31,226.61
Mattawan $12,083.14
Maybee $3,350.54
Mayville $4,757.60
McBain $3,938.44
McBride $1,134.44
Mecosta $2,802.81
Melvin $1,829.87
Melvindale $35,042.04
Memphis $5,111.94
Mendon $4,904.30
Menominee $41,088.87
Merrill $3,866.53
Mesick $2,885.36
Metamora $2,717.05
Michiana $2,891.77
Middleville $13,886.21
Midland $228,777.84
Milan $23,326.28
Milford $22,689.44
Millersburg $2,143.29
Millington $4,409.93
Minden City $1,722.93
Monroe $84,602.72
Montague $13,870.50
Montgomery $3,014.64
Montrose $6,903.22
Morenci $10,217.07
Morley $2,828.53
Morrice $4,823.99
Mount Clemens $58,168.80
Mt. Morris $12,393.73
Mt. Pleasant $98,106.74
Muir $3,145.50
Mulliken $2,715.78
Munising $16,471.93
Muskegon $189,743.25
Muskegon Heights $51,349.37
Nashville $7,687.48
Negaunee $27,218.51
New Baltimore $39,734.98
New Buffalo $11,425.21
New Era $4,219.63
New Haven $16,375.52
New Lothrop $3,009.73
Newaygo $11,697.86
Newberry $10,171.35
Niles $49,016.48
North Adams $2,470.32
North Branch $4,676.62
North Muskegon $17,291.68
Northport $4,215.84
Northville $21,740.47
Norton Shores $112,568.39
Norway $19,355.11
Novi $212,344.94
Oak Park $100,634.59
Oakley $2,135.23
Olivet $6,908.59
Omer $1,987.81
Onaway $5,438.55
Onekama $2,419.43
Onsted $4,303.16
Ontonagon $11,119.43
Orchard Lake $9,322.58
Ortonville $6,007.02
Otisville $3,910.42
Otsego $17,149.59
Otter Lake $2,721.36
Ovid $6,908.66
Owendale $2,155.10
Owosso $61,896.96
Oxford $13,782.44
Parchment $7,868.80
Parma $3,482.33
Paw Paw $15,026.85
Peck $2,548.75
Pellston $4,947.07
Pentwater $5,800.47
Perrinton $2,358.32
Perry $8,425.98
Petersburg $5,447.55
Petoskey $28,608.89
Pewamo $3,127.73
Pierson $1,463.17
Pigeon $5,545.07
Pinckney $9,220.29
Pinconning $6,269.98
Plainwell $16,074.25
Pleasant Ridge $9,391.86
Plymouth $32,079.25
Pontiac $261,215.23
Port Austin $3,513.27
Port Hope $1,808.28
Port Huron $139,149.59
Port Sanilac $3,101.36
Portage $220,859.59
Portland $19,460.65
Posen $1,742.88
Potterville $9,433.26
Powers $2,970.31
Prescott $2,893.44
Quincy $6,852.80
Ravenna $7,187.27
Reading $4,830.40
Reed City $12,233.27
Reese $6,853.96
Richland $2,881.51
Richmond $19,818.66
River Rouge $28,077.19
Riverview $39,910.66
Rochester $42,959.92
Rochester Hills $278,902.82
Rockford $20,268.53
Rockwood $10,964.38
Rogers City $15,587.26
Romeo $11,677.46
Romulus $100,222.29
Roosevelt Park $13,869.97
Roscommon $5,641.96
Rose City $4,047.05
Rosebush $2,208.24
Roseville $177,193.64
Rothbury $2,797.71
Royal Oak $236,243.85
Saginaw $274,164.65
Saline $33,639.79
Sand Lake $3,099.79
Sandusky $12,364.15
Sanford $4,564.91
Saranac $5,919.36
Saugatuck $6,258.59
Sault Ste. Marie $74,320.44
Schoolcraft $7,823.47
Scottville $6,585.94
Sebewaing $8,609.25
Shelby $12,606.82
Shepherd $6,610.81
Sheridan $3,523.45
Sherwood $2,253.94
Shoreham $2,852.09
South Haven $23,460.99
South Lyon $35,138.54
South Range $5,115.42
South Rockwood $7,971.66
Southfield $312,585.38
Southgate $104,058.67
Sparta $15,633.46
Spring Lake $11,701.46
Springfield $25,180.22
Springport $3,185.23
St. Charles $10,020.81
St. Clair $22,399.23
St. Clair Shores $214,222.24
St. Ignace $13,255.34
St. Johns $32,764.86
St. Joseph $33,569.80
St. Louis $25,985.68
Standish $7,735.86
Stanton $6,346.06
Stanwood $1,132.71
Stephenson $5,390.64
Sterling $4,180.39
Sterling Heights $459,519.82
Stevensville $6,471.18
Stockbridge $4,818.98
Sturgis $45,407.17
Sunfield $2,813.13
Suttons Bay $5,844.78
Swartz Creek $23,203.04
Sylvan Lake $6,697.71
Tawas City $9,780.80
Taylor $239,809.98
Tecumseh $35,924.26
Tekonsha $4,997.15
Thompsonville $3,721.95
Three Oaks $7,583.94
Three Rivers $32,884.91
Traverse City $64,452.62
Trenton $62,808.42
Troy $319,404.18
Turner $1,592.51
Tustin $1,634.43
Twining $1,388.99
Ubly $4,276.94
Union City $7,832.31
Unionville $2,608.67
Utica $16,608.13
Vandalia $2,106.70
Vanderbilt $4,182.12
Vassar $12,689.13
Vermontville $4,156.12
Vernon $4,106.63
Vicksburg $13,903.02
Wakefield $18,647.27
Waldron $3,226.21
Walker $102,278.79
Walkerville $2,419.84
Walled Lake $22,909.22
Warren $524,461.55
Watervliet $7,776.71
Wayland $16,993.93
Wayne $60,944.49
Webberville $5,666.56
West Branch $10,282.32
Westland $291,778.34
Westphalia $4,174.68
White Cloud $7,286.60
White Pigeon $6,783.74
Whitehall $15,974.96
Whittemore $2,247.79
Williamston $14,652.36
Wixom $46,650.69
Wolverine $3,067.25
Wolverine Lake $15,508.01
Woodhaven $39,400.73
Woodland $1,925.14
Wyandotte $96,682.30
Wyoming $304,371.94
Yale $7,581.81
Ypsilanti $68,251.08
Zeeland $25,383.61
Zilwaukee $8,032.38
TOTAL: $21,800,000.00

TheCapitolTheatre.comFounding Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh is set to begin a new residency at The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, New York, on Wednesday night with his collaborative musical collective Phil Lesh & Friends. The veteran rocker has scheduled two four-night stands at the venue, Source Article…

Photo: Rocky SchenckLinda Ronstadt is among this year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honorees, but you won’t see the renowned and versatile singer at the induction ceremony, which takes place April 10 in Brooklyn, New York. Ronstadt recently revealed that she’s been battling Parkinson’s Source Article…

Please join the Munising Chapter of Ducks Unlimited for our annual fundraising banquet. Enjoy an evening of raffles, auctions, and games to raise money for conservation.

Date 04/12/2014

Start Time 05:30 PM

End Time 10:30 PM

lger County Animal Shelters Waggin’ Tails Chili Fest fund raiser. It’s an all you can eat, on Sunday March 30 from noon til 5pm at the American Legion Canteen 610 W Munising Ave. There will be a silent auction, raffles, 50/50, live music and all benefits the shelter. $7 per person and $6 Veterans. Kids under 4 Free! For more info:wwwalgeranimalshelter.org or 906 387 4131.

Thank you so much. If you have any questions, you can contact the Shelter -Kathy 906 387 4131 or me Chris Ledbetter 906-439-5755. Sincerely, Chris Ledbetter

GEORGE IN THE MORNING

This morning I had the privelege of talking to Jason Allen the executive director of veterans affairs in Michigan. Appropiatly he gave a little history on the Irish who have served our country beginning with the Civil War.

I found this interesting and believe you will too.  george

MUNISING, Mich. The National Park Service has scheduled two public scoping sessions for a new planning process involving the Sand Point revetment at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

Scoping is the first step to inform and involve the public in the planning process. The National Park Service is conducting scoping by holding public meetings and providing opportunities for individuals to ask questions and provide comment. The NPS uses public questions and comments to ensure the possible issues and concerns for this rock revetment project and management of resources are considered.

The Grand Marais meeting will be held at the Burt Township Community Center, E21738 Brazel Street, on Wednesday, March 19, 6 to 8 p.m.

The Munising meeting will be held at the Alger Heritage Center, 1496 Washington Street, on Thursday, March 20, 6 to 8 p.m.

The meetings will begin with opening remarks from park superintendent Mike Pflaum. NPS staff will brief the public on the planning effort’s purpose, need, objectives and preliminary alternatives. In addition, NPS staff will answer questions and solicit input from the public on issues and concerns they want addressed as part of the planning process and its analysis of environmental consequences.

People may also submit comments on written forms available at the meetings, on-line, via postal mail or fax. Comments will not be accepted via email. For comments to be the most useful in developing this EA, please submit by April 14, 2014.

To submit a comment online, please visit http://parkplanning.nps.gov/PIRO .

The purpose of this environmental assessment is to develop alternatives, to the extent possible, that allow natural shoreline processes while restoring or preserving the natural and cultural resources. This coastal restoration project is needed to reassess prior shoreline stabilization actions at Sand Point and determine and assess future management actions based on the best currently available scientific information.

Any person wishing to receive notifications concerning this process can submit their name and e-mail address, which will be placed on a mailing list. Requests can be sent to piro_sand_point_ea @ nps.gov. Comments will not be accepted at this email.

www.nps.gov

(MUNISING, Mich.) A summer work opportunity is available for area young people through the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) program at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. Youth between the ages of 15 and 18 may apply for the YCC program. There are no income restrictions for this youth employment program.

YCC, a nationwide program for young people, provides opportunities to contribute to the conservation of our national parks, forests, and wildlife refuges through a combined work and environmental education program.

The young people will work with National Park Service professionals on conservation related projects in the Munising district of the lakeshore. Projects will include facility improvements and clean-up, trail maintenance, and the construction of steps, bridges, and boardwalks.

The Pictured Rocks YCC program will run eight weeks beginning June 9, 2014. The youth work a 40-hour week and receive $7.40 per hour.

Applications must be received no later than Tuesday, April 15. They must be submitted to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, N8391 Sand Point Road, P.O. Box 40, Munising, Michigan 49862.

Enrollees are selected from among all youth submitting applications to the Pictured Rocks headquarters office for four positions in the Munising district. Please note there are no positions anticipated for the Grand Marais district.

Selections of YCC enrollees are made by random drawing. The drawing and notification of selections will occur during the week of April 21. The names of alternates will also be drawn for the program. These young people will be backups to fill positions if any of the original YCC enrollees decline a position.

Questions about the YCC work program may be directed to Pictured Rocks Chief of Maintenance Steve Howard, telephone 387-2607, extension 209. Applications are available at the Munising High School, Superior Central School, Michigan Works, and the Pictured Rocks Headquarters at N8391 Sand Point Road in Munising.