The Who in 1979 (Waring Abbott/Getty Images)A permanent memorial marker honoring the 11 people who died during an accident before a December 3, 1979, concert by The Who at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Coliseum — now called U.S. Bank Arena — will be dedicated on Thursday, the 36th anniversary of the tragedy. The concertgoers were killed, and many others were injured, as fans pushed to enter the venue, which was offering general admission festival-style seating for the event.

CityBeat.com reports that the dedication ceremony will be held at 7 p.m. ET on the plaza between U.S. Bank Arena and Great American Ball Park. Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, who has been a vocal supporter of the memorial, will be on hand to dedicate the marker. In addition, lanterns will be lit at the event in remembrance of those who died.

The two-sided marker will appear on a post in the plaza. On one side, the names of the people who were killed, their ages and their hometowns will appear, along with an inscription that says, “deepest respects to the families, many survivors, friends and first responders.” The other side of the memorial includes a description of the incident, and reads, “Eleven concertgoers, trapped in a crush of people, died at the southwest plaza entrance to Riverfront Coliseum waiting to see The Who. Many others were injured in what was the deadliest concert tragedy in United States history. The tragedy spurred passage of a crowd safety ordinance, which became a model for the world.”

The memorial is the result of a campaign spearheaded by Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation, a local nonprofit organization founded in 2007. The foundation privately raised about $5,000 to pay for the marker.

Among the people who will be attending the dedication ceremony is Andy Bowes, whose younger brother Peter died during the tragic incident.

Andy tells CityBeat.com that he has been in contact with The Who’s management and says that the band supports the memorial.

“I’m never going to stop thinking about my brother, and for me and my counterparts there is no end,” says Bowes. “But I think this is taking something that deserves some sort of permanent recognition and finally giving it.”

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