David M. Benett/Dave Benett/WireImageEric Clapton has enjoyed a legendary music career, but the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer is not proud of some moments in his life, including what he calls his “semi-racist” past.

A new authorized documentary called Eric Clapton: A Life in 12 Bars focuses on the guitarist’s career, and as The Daily Mail reports, following a January 10 screening in London, Clapton apologized for some controversial statements he made in the 1970s that were captured in the film.

During a 1976 concert in Birmingham, England, Clapton appeared to side with the right-wing National Front movement, whose stated purpose was to “Keep Britain White.” From the stage, he said, in part, “Stop Britain from becoming a black colony. Get the foreigners out. England is for white people, man. We are a white country…this is Great Britain, a white country. What is happening to us?”

Clapton’s comments are said to have inspired the Rock Against Racism campaign, which rallied against the very sentiment the guitarist expressed during his onstage rant.

According to the The Daily Mail, in a Q&A following the documentary screening, Clapton expressed remorse for his comments. “I sabotaged everything I got involved with,” said the musician. “I was so ashamed of who I was, a kind of semi-racist, which didn’t make sense. Half of my friends were black, I dated a black woman, and I championed black music.”

Clapton has apologized in the past for his comments, partly blaming the outburst on his drug and alcohol addiction at the time.

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